NOTES


Pre-2016: Print submission are currently closed, and likely will be for the relatively foreseeable future. (Like... maybe forever? Let's wait and see together for a bit.) SF/LD Book submissions are also now closed. Sorry. No previously submitted manuscripts are still in consideration (If your submission is still "In Progress" that is just because we didn't send out replies -- you're welcome to withdraw it, or forever be pending). Thank you.


That said: We are pretty much always reading for the website (short fiction, nonfiction, poetry, craft based interviews, other kinds of fun interviews, food & drink pieces, other ideas we may come up with later or you may even pitch us).

There are slightly more detailed guidelines below, under their respective categories, but most boil down to the pretty self-explanatory titles of the categories (web poetry, web fiction, etc.) and "familiarize yourself with the journal, be awesome, etc." 

Finally, re: photos: If you’re interested in having your work featured please send a few images for consideration. No more than 6, sized to 1200px on the longest side, 72dpi, sRGB, jpeg. Landscape format works best. Send to tara (at) tarawray.net.



If you have any questions, feel free to email aaron@hobartpulp.com.
Please note, however, that most correspondence regarding submissions (withdrawals, etc) should be done here, via our online submission manager

The nitty gritty:

We, of course, recommend you be at least vaguely familiar with what we have published in the past. Once that is out of the way, there really isn't much more we can tell you. More instructions would really only clutter this page, wouldn't it? We want stories that are what we like to call "web-friendly" meaning, shorter than about 2,000 words or so though 1,000 or less is even better.

Submit only one story at time, not more than 2,000 words (but shorter than this has a better chance, to be honest). If you're submitting short shorts (around 400 words or less), you can submit up to three stories in a single file. Multiple submissions will be deleted unread.

-Jensen Beach, Ben Gross, & Elizabeth Ellen, Web Editors


What we want:

We want poetry from the margins—words that open new space without closing off recurring possibilities.  There's no one type of poem that we prefer of the other, although we're interested in poetry that doesn't necessarily know it's poetry: work that the uncareful reader might mistake for prose. Send us your barroom promises, your church pew utterances, your missives from that broken place between language and experience. We are looking to be moved by the beauty in what is common.

Also, we like poems about dogs, possums, and ugly babies.

How we want it:

Send us 3 to 5ish previously unpublished poems in a single document along with a brief cover letter. 

— Caleb Curtiss, Madison Langston, & Paul Asta, Web Poetry Editors

Pretty much see: "WEB FICTION" but, you know, make it non.

Also note that we tend to like our nonfiction to be more about something and less "short memoir"-y pieces, if that makes any sense. If we think of a better way to explain that, we'll update this description.

Finally, currently reading is nonfiction is: Jac Jemc!

$ 7.23

A while back, I made a kinda off-handed joke on Facebook about journals charging reading fees, and the comments devolved mostly into jokes and criticizing other journals, and then Kyle Minor commented, "I'd pay $7.23 to submit to Hobart, I think," and so I created this category. Kinda, maybe, at least a little as a joke? But some of y'all are actually paying us $7.23 to consider your submission, hopefully intending it as a kind of donation in goodwill, for which we feel a little quilty but are hugely thankful.

So... basically... if you believe in us, believe that we're trying to do something good, and you want to drop a few dollars in our pockets for, then we appreciate it! And/or if you just think this ridiculously blatant money grab is $7.23 worth of funny, that works, too.

Paying this fee will not get you read any sooner, nor any more "personal comments." Unless you ask for them. Maybe. We'll consider submissions for the web, as print subs are not currently open.

Thanks.

Here's the deal: at some point, Kyle Minor made something of a joke, "I'd pay $7.23 to submit to Hobart, I think," and so I created the Kyle Minor submission. But $7.23 seems too much to charge for a submission, joke or not. But, the occasional supporter has been paying it, which we appreciate, obviously, so here's a more reasonable means of submitting and supporting at once.

Paying this fee will not get you read any sooner, nor any more "personal comments." 

We'll consider submissions for the web right now, as print subs are closed. 

Thanks.


We're looking for comics!

You can see the type of stuff we've done here:
http://www.hobartpulp.com/categories/comics


ALSO: We have been running serialized comics, "Sunday Comics," rotating through three different series. So, new installment of each every third week. "Those Bears" is, unfortunately, taking a hiatus until January. Interested in serializing a comic on Hobart? Pitch us something! Send some sample art, let's go from there! 

Basically a subsection of WEB NONFICTION but, well, obviously, food and/or drink specific. We don't know exactly what we are looking for for these kinds of pieces yet -- basically short essays about food and drink. Maybe reviews, but the kinds of reviews that are at least, if not moreso, personal essays? That kind of stuff. Thanks.

Size limit: 2,000 words

This is essentially the same as WEB NONFICTION, but a subcategory not unlike "Food & Drink." I'm not entirely sure what I'm looking for here, but pitch ideas. What would you like to see on the daily Hobart Web? More short interviews? Essays about...? It could also be some kind of specific fiction series. Dave Housley pitched a "commercial fiction" column, and we ran those for months and they even turned into a book! Rachel Yoder made a joke that we should do Breaking Bad fan fic, and then we did! Matt Sailor is currently writing "Great Moments in Cinematic Drinking," and Tabitha Blankenbiller chronicled her "Games of My Youth."   Be brave, send ideas.

Thanks,
Aaron Burch